Traction control (TCS)

Traction control is a driver aid feature that helps your vehicle maintain traction of the wheels, typically when driving on slippery and/or hilly road surfaces, by detecting and controlling wheel spin.

Excessive wheel spin is controlled in two ways, which may work separately or in tandem: engine traction control and brake traction control. Engine traction control works to limit drive-wheel spin by momentarily reducing engine power. Brake traction control works to limit wheel spin by momentarily applying the brakes to the wheel that is slipping. Traction control is most active at low speeds.

During traction control events, the stability control light in the instrument cluster will flash.

If the traction control system is activated excessively in a short period of time, the braking portion of the system may become temporarily disabled to allow the brakes to cool down. In this situation, traction control will use only engine power reduction or transfer to help control the wheels from over-spinning. When the brakes have cooled down, the system will regain all features. Anti-lock braking, RSC , and ESC are not affected by this condition and will continue to function during the cool-down period.

The engine traction control and brake traction control system may be deactivated in certain situations. See the Switching off traction control section below.

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