Electronic stability control (ESC)

Electronic stability control (ESC) may enhance your vehicles directional stability during adverse maneuvers, for example when cornering severely or avoiding objects in the roadway. ESC operates by applying brakes to one or more of the wheels individually and, if necessary, reducing engine power if the system detects that the vehicle is about to skid or slide laterally.

During electronic stability control events, the stability control light in the instrument cluster will flash.

Certain adverse driving maneuvers may activate the electronic stability control system, which include but are not limited to:

Taking a turn too fast Maneuvering quickly to avoid an accident, pedestrian or obstacle Driving over a patch of ice or other slippery surfaces Changing lanes on a snow-rutted road Entering a snow-free road from a snow-covered side street, or vice versa
Entering a paved road from a gravel road, or vice versa Cornering while towing a heavily loaded trailer (refer to Trailer towing in the Tires, Wheels and Loading chapter)

    See also:

    Preparing your vehicle
    When the battery is disconnected or a new battery is installed, the automatic transmission must relearn its shift strategy. As a result, the transmission may have firm and/or soft shifts. This opera ...

    Connecting an external device - Vehicles With: Bluetooth
    Connecting a Bluetooth audio device CAUTION: As various standards exist, manufacturers are able to implement a variety of profiles in their Bluetooth devices. Because of this, an incompatibilit ...

    CVH engines
    The 1.6 litre CVH engine was introduced in September 1991, to replace the 1.6 litre SOHC engine used previously in the Sierra range. The engine is broadly similar to the 1.8 litre (R2A type) CVH e ...