Blind spot mirrors

Blind spot mirrors have an integrated convex spotter mirror built into the upper outboard corner of the outside mirrors. They are designed to assist the driver by increasing visibility along the side of the vehicle. For more information on your side view mirrors, refer to Exterior mirrors in the Driver Controls chapter.

Driving with blind spot mirrors

Before a lane change, check the main mirror first, then check the blind spot mirror. If no vehicles are present in the blind spot mirror and the traffic in the adjacent lane is at a safe distance, signal that you are going to change lanes. Glance over your shoulder to verify traffic is clear, and carefully change lanes.

When the approaching vehicle is at a distance, its image is small and near the inboard edge of the main mirror. As the vehicle approaches, the image becomes larger and begins to move outboard across the main mirror (1). As the vehicle approaches its image will transition from the main mirror and begin to appear in the blind spot mirror (2).

As the vehicle leaves the blind spot mirror it will transition to the driver’s peripheral field of view (3).

WARNING: Objects in the blind spot mirror are closer than they


appear. WARNING: Objects in the blind spot mirror are closer than they
appear.

    See also:

    Head restraints
    Adjusting the head restraint WARNINGS: Raise the rear head restraint when the rear seat is occupied by a passenger. When using a forward facing child restraint on a rear seat, always remove t ...

    Electric exterior mirrors
    Electric exterior mirrors Left-hand mirror A Off B Right-hand mirror C The switch is located in the trim panel of the driver’s door. Mirror tilting positions On some models, the door mirror ...

    Hazard warning flashers
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